Thursday, August 7, 2008

Leg of Lamb

So I sent four yearling rams to slaughter last week. They called me with their weights and asked me what I wanted to do with them. I asked the lady. They make NINETEEN kinds of Brats! I thought there were three, beef, turkey and regular LOL. See how much I know?

How much are your hanging weights when you butcher yearling rams? Anyone? Mine were about what I expected as my boys are on the smaller side of the scale. 23-26# hanging weight.

I'm saving 4 leg of lamb roasts and the rest is getting turned into 'fresh' brats and breakfast sausage (bulk, that i can make into patties)

Sounds exciting! I can't hardly wait!

2 comments:

Becky Utecht said...

I don't usually get hanging weights from the butcher, I get the live weight and then I weigh the packaged meat I get back. Our Shetland yearlings (15 mos) are usually around 65 to 80 pounds LWT. We usually get back 20-25 (sometimes 30) pounds of packaged lamb. We have the shoulder roasts boned out for stew meat. I love lamb stew! We also get the lamb chops and one whole leg and have the other leg cut into steaks. We get the trimmings for grinding up ourselves later into burger or sausage. On an older sheep we'd go for straight brats, etc., but those yearlings are still plenty tender to enjoy the chops and steaks. I tried the marinating in milk tip on some older ram meat and it really worked to get rid of the gamey taste and tough texture. Good luck with your brats and patties!

Kathy said...

All I know is I'm coming to your house for dinner, Garrett! Yum! I will probably turn a couple of ours into freezer fodder myself. You can't keep them all - a sad fact of farming, but if the boys aren't breeding quality, or fiber quality, they can serve other purposes.
Take care,
Kathy in Airy Zona

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