Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Ready or not, here we go! (to Jefferson!)

Well I have diligently been tying out and trying to walk the three lambs every day that I have time (which is most weekdays). Centennial and Lyons are walking on lead fairly well, especially with a bit of grain. Sheridan unfortunately thinks I am the devil himself! Every time she sees me she lays down and thinks I can't see her. She was never a friendly ewe, but you'd think she'd get used to the idea by now! Centennial and Lyons when they were younger decided that they liked me. I nearly cried when I started halter training them and they would run the other way when they saw the halters in my hand. They are now starting to warm up to me again and stand stacked while I scratch them.


This is WhitePine Centennial. She was my very first lamb of the season and was my favorite girl (and still is). She is quite consistent from front to back, with some britch wool, but is very crimpy and soft. Her back half is more bluish fleece while the front half is more creamy. She's a gem! She is out of Jazz and Chloe.



These next two photos are of WhitePine Lyons. He is my favorite horned ram of the year and is in the process of going from black to dark brown to shaela (what all of my shaelas do anyway) He is very very soft, crimpy from front to rear with little britch wool. His horns are perfect and he is friendly enough, but not overbearing. He has a perfect tail, nice length and height, he is slightly hocked but other than that a very fine specimen. He is the best at walking on lead.


Sheridan lays down as I approach............will I ever gain her trust?


When she realizes I'm not there to 'abuse' her to learn to walk, she stands on the opposite side of the tree LOL. She is black. Her father is Jazz and her mother is Shasta. Its interesting that she has no crimp and will have a more intermediate style fleece. She's soft, but only has crimp just now coming in on the front half of her body. Both parents are very crimpy. I chose her as I knew the judges prefer the longer fleeces and she has a perfect build, wide rear end, straight legs, level topline. We'll see what the judges think.........

udpate at 4pm (Sheridan walked on the lead, if only awkwardly! We finished on that note!)

4 comments:

Sharrie said...

Good luck with that "walking" thing. The lambs sure can put on a show when they don't want to walk on a lead. It is all for show, but we really don't appreciate it much.

Nancy K. said...

Mine will usually lead fairly well. It's the standing still that's a problem. And the minute the judge lays a finger on them ~ they're AIRBORN!!!

I have no pride...

Pine Pod Farm said...

I'm glad I don't have sheep anymore though.

Sarah said...

OK, it obviously shouts the obvious-I grew up in the suburbs and never had the experience of state fairs, 4-H or anything remotely similar.

But, I'll ask anyway...

Exactly how do you stack a sheep? Somehow, I don't think the rules for dogs (control the head with one hand, use the other to set the legs) apply to sheep!!!

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